Luftwaffe and Allied Air Forces Discussion Forum

Luftwaffe and Allied Air Forces Discussion Forum (http://forum.12oclockhigh.net/index.php)
-   Allied and Soviet Air Forces (http://forum.12oclockhigh.net/forumdisplay.php?f=7)
-   -   F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron (http://forum.12oclockhigh.net/showthread.php?t=17449)

Bruce Lander 7th July 2009 17:32

F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Hi,

Just reading "What A Bloody Arrival" by Martin Smith, he flew with 248 Sqd and claimed 3 victories. He does not appear in "Those Other Eagles" but his DFM citation does confirm his claims. The first 2 were HE.111's claimed while 248 had a detachment at Portreath between September and December 1941- unfortunately Smith does not give the dates.His 3rd was a Bv.138 ( of 2/Ku.Fl.Gr.406, K6+DK W.Nr310090 ) on 08 June 1942 over the N.Sea. Can anyone provide details of his first 2 claims - Dates etc.Luftwaffe units etc ? He also mentions a Sgt.Alan Welsh who claimed 2 victories during this period is there any info on this pilot?

I have the following claims for 248 during 1940 p to mid 1942:-

18.05.40 F/Lt.A.W.Pennington-Leigh Bf.110

P/O.E.H.McHardy Bf.110
(sadly these were both French aircraft shot down in error)

28.09.40 P/O.C.C.Bennett Do.18 ( of 2/406)

03.11.40 P/O.E.H.McHardy He.111 Dam

09.05.41 Sgt Cripps Ju.88A-5 (VA+CP,II?KG.1 ,
W.Nr 2231)


30.10.41 Sgt.South & Sgt.Lee He.111 Prob

27.12.41 S/Ldr. D.L.Cartridge He.111

F/Lt.B.F.Rose He.111

22.02.42 P/O Graham He.111 Dam

02.04.42 F/Lt.B.F.Rose He.115

F/Sgt J.A,A,L.Boussa He.115, He.115 Dam

Sgt.G.P.Windsor He.111

08.06.42 F/Sgt.M.Smith Bv.138 (2/406 K6+DK 310090)

09.06.42 S/Ldr.R.E.Morewood Bv.138 (2/406 K6+?? 311109)
actually 30% Dam


I do have 3 more pages of 248 claims after this period but I will leave it there for now.

Can anyone add to or correct this listing.

Cheers

Bruce Lander

phasselgren 12th July 2009 22:21

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bruce Lander (Post 88257)
Hi,

Just reading "What A Bloody Arrival" by Martin Smith, he flew with 248 Sqd and claimed 3 victories. He does not appear in "Those Other Eagles" but his DFM citation does confirm his claims. The first 2 were HE.111's claimed while 248 had a detachment at Portreath between September and December 1941- unfortunately Smith does not give the dates.His 3rd was a Bv.138 ( of 2/Ku.Fl.Gr.406, K6+DK W.Nr310090 ) on 08 June 1942 over the N.Sea. Can anyone provide details of his first 2 claims - Dates etc.Luftwaffe units etc ? He also mentions a Sgt.Alan Welsh who claimed 2 victories during this period is there any info on this pilot?

I have the following claims for 248 during 1940 p to mid 1942:-

18.05.40 F/Lt.A.W.Pennington-Leigh Bf.110

P/O.E.H.McHardy Bf.110
(sadly these were both French aircraft shot down in error)
According to the A Clasp For the Few by Kennth G. Wynn McHardy and another pilot shot down a He 111 on the same sortie but this is not mentioned in any other book (see also the answers I received to my post “235 Sqn in action over Holland and Belgium May 1940” on this Forum)

28.09.40 P/O.C.C.Bennett Do.18 ( of 2/406)

03.11.40 P/O.E.H.McHardy He.111 Dam
According to Battle of Britain, the Forgotten Months by John Foreman this was shared with PO Garrad and PO Atkinson “attack and badly damage a He111H-3 of I/KG26” BUT according to Those Other Eagles by Christopher Shores the He 111 was probably destroyed and only McHardy made the claim.

09.05.41 Sgt Cripps Ju.88A-5 (VA+CP,II?KG.1 ,
W.Nr 2231)

30.10.41 Sgt.South & Sgt.Lee He.111 Prob

27.12.41 S/Ldr. D.L.Cartridge He.111

F/Lt.B.F.Rose He.111

22.02.42 P/O Graham He.111 Dam

02.04.42 F/Lt.B.F.Rose He.115

F/Sgt J.A,A,L.Boussa He.115, He.115 Dam

Sgt.G.P.Windsor He.111

08.06.42 F/Sgt.M.Smith Bv.138 (2/406 K6+DK 310090)

09.06.42 S/Ldr.R.E.Morewood Bv.138 (2/406 K6+?? 311109)
actually 30% Dam

I do have 3 more pages of 248 claims after this period but I will leave it there for now.

Can anyone add to or correct this listing.

Cheers

Bruce Lander

Hi Bruce,

A later answer because i have been away on holiday.

Some additions and comments (included above) with information from some books but unfortunately little based on first hand sources like ORBs or Combat reports.

13.05.40 P/O.E.H.McHardy (from New Zealand) E/A Dam shared with 3 other pilots (see Those Other Eagles and my post “235 Sqn in action over Holland and Belgium May 1940” on this Forum)

02.10.40 A.F. Fowler (from New Zealand) Do 215 Dam, Fowler was wounded and received a DFC for this action (see A Clasp For the Few by Kennth G. Wynn this is also mentioned in the Official History of New Zealanders in the RAF).

20.10.40 P/O G. M. Baird (from New Zealand) Do 215 was himself shot down and becam POW together with his crew (see A Clasp For the Few). I don´t know if this claim was officially recognized.

I will check 1941 and -42 tomorrow.

Cheers
Peter Hasselgren

Frank Olynyk 12th July 2009 23:30

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Oct 30, 1941 at 0900, He-111 dam, 60 m SW of Scillies, by Sgt Lee+Sgt Taylor (no first names) in T4776 "F", and Sgt Martin Smith+Sgt Richard Hutchison in T4721 "Q".

Nov 6, 1941 at 0944, He-111 prob, SW of Scillies, by Sgts Lee+Taylor in T4711 "W", and Sgts Smith+Hutchison in T4786 "G".

June 8, 1942 at 2130, Ha-140 dest, NE of Shetlands LZZG 4443, by Sgt Martin Smith+unstated obs in T5101 "K".

June 17, 1942 at 0546, He-111 dam, North Sea, LZCM 4630, by Sgt A Welch+FSgt P H Heath in T4781 "H".

These are all taken from the ORB.

Frank.

Bruce Lander 13th July 2009 20:24

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Hi,

thanks guys for your responses, obviously I had the 30/10/41 claim attributed to Sgt.South when it should have been Smith.
These Coastal fighter units have been sadly neglected so far and most claimed more kills than several regular fighter Squadrons.
I would be most interested in any more information on these units and happy to share my own research (incomplete as it is)

Cheers

Bruce Lander

phasselgren 14th July 2009 21:55

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Hi Bruce,
Just checked the Jan 41 to June 42-period and I have nothing to add to the claim-lists.
I agree these units have been neglected. My interest is focused on claims by New Zealanders (both by pilots and air gunners) but because so little has been written about air to air claims by these units I started to dig a little myself. Unfortunately I have not so much information but you are welcome to contact me off the board.
Cheers
Peter

Martin Gleeson 15th July 2009 00:50

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Bruce,

I believe Andy Bird plans to write such a book. See his post a page back for July 7th.

Regards,

Martin Glleson.

AUS_RAAF 16th July 2009 12:20

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Hi Bruce,

As the username suggests my interest is in the Australian/RAAF side of things. Unfortunately I cannot add too much to the information already supplied. However, I would be very keen to learn what further details you have of the combat claims attributed to 248 Sqn and other coastal command units.

You are probably aware that P/O Bennett was an Australian in the RAF while F/Lt Rose & Sgt Windsor were both RAAF. So far my list of Australian aircrew serving with 248 Sqn during WWII is up to fourteen. Of this number, Rose, along with R.F.Hammond and P.J.O. Mueller were the more successful in terms of aerial claims (all their claims were during 1941/42). My nominal lists for 235 & 236 Sqns are surprisingly similar in terms of personnel 235 Sqn – 13 Aussies and 236 Sqn – 15.

Feel free to email me - dDOTharrATbigpondDOTcom (replace DOT & AT with the necessary symbols).

Regards, Drew H

Chris Goss 17th July 2009 16:32

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
There were quite a number of 248 Sqn combats inconclusive or otherwise. I have them on the following dates:

1 Mar 41, 6 Apr 41, 1 May 41, 6 May 41, 9 May 41, 10 may 41, 12 Jun 41, 30 Oct 41, 6 Nov 41, 11 Nov 41, 27 dec 41, 22 feb 42, 1 Apr 42, 2 Apr 42, 15 Apr 42, 8 Jun 42, 9 Jun 42, 17 Jun 42

Bruce Lander 17th July 2009 19:06

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Hi Chris,

Thanks for the reply,as always you again demonstrate your Premier League status.

I just got your latest excellent book on SKG10 etc.first class!

I would be interested in claimants names for the dates you note if possible

Cheers

Bruce

Chris Goss 19th July 2009 15:41

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Thanks Bruce for your generous comments!

I am afraid I do not have names but do have the following:

1 Mar 41: Ac A. Unknown off Wick inconclusive 1315 hrs
6 Apr 41: V. Ju 88 inconclusive off Stonehaven 1410 hrs
1 May 41: M. Ju 88 dam Mary Bank 1545 hrs
6 May 41: F & L. He 115 inconclusive Devil's Hole 2215 hrs
9 May 41: Ju 88 dest North Sea 2216 hrs
10 May 41: J. FW 200 dam Bill Bailey's Bank 1250 hrs
12 Jun 41: X. He 111 dam North Sea 1300 hrs
12 Jun 41: Y. Bf 110 inconclusive S.Norway 1232 hrs. Ac damaged
13 Jun 41: X. Ju 88 inconclusive NNE Devil's Hole 0840 hrs
30 Oct 41: He 111 dam SW Scillies 0900 hrs
6 Nov 41: He 111 prob sw Scillies 0944 hrs
11 Nov 41: Z. Bf 110 inconclusive W. Scillies 0907 hrs
27 Dec 41: F, C, J, N. He 111 prob Bf 109 dam Maloy is 1500 hrs
22 Feb 42: U. He 111 inconclusive Rattray Hd 0815 hrs
1 Apr 42: X. Ju 88 inconclusive Skaggerrak 1850 hrs
2 Apr 42: C. He 111 dest North Sea 1715 hrs
2 Apr 42: X. He 115 dest North Sea 1805 hsr
2 Apr 42: N. He 111 inconclusive North Sea 1200 hrs
2 Apr 42: N. He 111 inconclusive North Sea 1245 hrs. Ac damaged.
2 Apr 42: R & P. He 111 dam North Sea 1235 hrs
2 Apr 42: T. He 111 dam North Sea 1544 hrs
2 Apr 42: T. He 115 dam North Sea 1702 hrs
15 Apr 42: B & D. Ju 88 dam east coast of Scotland 0815 hrs
8 Jun 42: K. Ha 140 dest NE Shetlands 2130 hrs
9 Jun 42: F. Ha 138 dam NE Shetlands 0659 hrs.
17 Jun 42: H. He 11 dam North Sea. Ac damaged

Chris

Bruce Lander 19th July 2009 20:58

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Hi Chris,

thanks for the information,

Cheers

Bruce

martintwigg 1st February 2010 15:21

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Has anyone got information about 248 squadron from aug 42 to jan 43. My uncle gordon edward twigg was shot down over biscay dec 1 1942.
Many thanks

Peter Cornwell 3rd February 2010 11:51

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Interesting thread. I have the following details/comments in relation to the various 1940 claims/losses mentioned and will be grateful for any further input and/or revisions:

May 18, 1940: AC 2 Potez 631. Shot down by Blenheims of No. 248 Squadron following skirmish with a Ju88 of 8./KG30 and ditched in the sea off Nieuport 4.30 p.m. Possibly that attacked by F/L A.W. Pennington-Leigh.SM Domas and SM Le Thomas killed. Aircraft a write-off.

May 18, 1940: AC 2 Potez 631 (169). Shot down by Blenheims of No. 248 Squadron following skirmish with a Ju88 of 8./KG30 over Nieuport and crashed in flames in the sea off De Panne 4.30 p.m. Possibly that attacked by P/O E.H. McHardy.Mtre J. Dupont missing. SM Le Bot baled out wounded, fired on by allied troops while in his parachute and man-handled on landing, but treated at the Hôtel de l’Océan and later captured. Aircraft lost.
This was by no means an isolated or even uncommon occurrence in these desperate times. British crews involved in this tragic incident were convinced that they had attacked Bf110s, while the sole French survivor was equally sure that he had been shot down by Ju88s.(Source: The Battle of France Then & Now as amended.)

September 28, 1940: 2./KüFlGr. 406 Dornier Do18G-1 (0884). Ditched off the south-west coast of Norway due to engine failure during reconnaissance sortie 8.30 p.m. Crew all rescued from dinghy, BO Oberlt zur See Gerhard Meyering injured, rest of crew unhurt. Aircraft K6+JK 100% write-off.
The time of loss seems to preclude any connection with the Do18 engaged earlier in the day by P/O Bennett of No.248 Squadron during a sortie 0845-1031 and for which no claim was actually made.

October 3, 1940: Wekusta Ob.d.L. Dornier Do17Z-2 (2547). Crashed on landing damaged in attack by No.248 Squadron Blenheim (P/O A.L. Fowler) during weather reconnaissance sortie over the North Sea off Sumburgh 8.30 a.m. BO Reg. Rat. [ ] Heinrich wounded, rest of crew unhurt. Aircraft T5+JU 60% damaged - write-off.

October 20, 1940: 1./KüFlGr. 406 Dornier Do18D-3 (0801). Damaged in action with Blenheim of No.248 Squadron (P/O G.M. Baird) during reconnaissance off south-west coast of Norway and ditched 80 miles west of Haugesund 10.05 a.m. Crew all rescued unhurt by Do18 K6+KH. Aircraft K6+DH 100% write-off.

November 4, 1940: 2./KG26 Heinkel He111H-3 (3171). Crashed and burned out at Skjørestadfjell, near Sandnes, south-east of Stavanger-Sola airfield, on return from sortie; cause unknown. FF Uffz Josef Mendler, BO Oberfw Otto Stuckmann, BF Uffz Erhard Reisch, and BM Uffz Wilhelm Zeckey all killed. Aircraft 1H+HK 100% write-off.
The aircraft credited to P/O Atkinson and P/O Garrad of No.248 Squadron by Foreman on the previous day. All my sources indicate that this loss occurred on November 4 ?

Chris Goss 3rd February 2010 12:22

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Martin: PM me as I have the information on his loss

Chris Goss 4th February 2010 18:09

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Sgt G E Twigg & Sgt J Brook were th crew of Beaufighter EL360/WR-A of 248 Sqn. It and 2 Beaus from 248 and 2 Beaus from 235 Sqn were shot down by Oblt Bruno Stolle, Fw Rudolf Eisele (2) and Uffz Leopold Groiss (2) of 8/JG 2

arnaud 6th February 2010 17:21

Re: F/Sgt.M.Smith 248 Squadron
 
Extracted from "Les Victoires de l'aviation de chasse française" tome 1 published in 2004 ! by Arnaud Gillet... This work will be translated in English soon but unfortunately, this is only in french...


Vers 14.00, le groupe II/8, l’AC 2 et le Squadron 248 envoient plusieurs appareils à leur secours.
Le Squadron 248 et le groupe II/8 interceptent d’abord un Junkers 88 de la 8./KG 30 :
« Trois Blenheim en formation à 5.000 pieds couvrent « Le chasseur de l’Arctique [1] » en cercle en une large ligne sur l’arrière.
Un grand convoi au loin évoluait le long de la côte au Sud-Ouest de Nieuport, et un avion non identifié est aperçu en glissant au-dessus et en-dessous du plafond nuageux à 10.000 pieds préparant apparemment une attaque du convoi. Les trois Blenheim, tout de suite, montent vers l’avion ennemi, un Heinkel 111 type V (lire Junkers 88), qui aussitôt prit pour cible un grand paquebot gris isolé et commença son bombardement en piqué. L’avion ennemi lâcha ses bombes à 2.000 pieds, mais manqua sa cible d’environ trois cents mètres. Les Blenheim suivirent le Heinkel (lire Junkers 88) et le mitrailleur arrière du « G » tira une longue rafale de soixante-quinze cartouches. Des balles traçantes furent vues entrer dans le fuselage de l’avion ennemi.
L’avion ennemi piquait aussi vite que les Blenheim incapables de se rapprocher pendant le plongeon. Pendant cette chute, les Blenheim « R » et « I » maintinrent leur position à environ deux cents / trois cents mètres en arrière et sur les deux côtés du Blenheim « G ».
Après avoir lâché ses bombes, le Heinkel (ibidem) continua son piqué jusqu’au niveau de la mer larguant les autres bombes à environ mille pieds et changea de cap de 45 °. Lorsque l’avion ennemi poussa au maximum sa vitesse, une traînée habituelle de fumée noire sortit des pipes d’échappement des deux moteurs. Les Blenheim le suivirent jusqu’au niveau de la mer. Le Blenheim « R » alors déclenche ces neuf unités de suralimentation et prend la tête, devant les Blenheim « G » et « I », qui n’étaient pas chargé avec de l’essence à 100 octanes. La poursuite continua pendant cinq à six minutes. Bien que l’indicateur de vitesse du Blenheim « R » indiquait 465 kilomètres à l’heure au niveau de la mer, le Blenheim fut incapable de s’approcher à moins de cinq cents mètres du Heinkel (ibidem) ; plusieurs rafales plein arrière sans aucune déflexion furent tirées à cette importante distance. Ce Heinkel (ibidem) n’avait aucune arme de côté, ni verrière gonflée » (CR Air 50/312 n° 2-3).
Ce sont les Bloch du groupe II/8 qui l’achèvent au large d’Ostende [2]. A l’exception du sous-lieutenant Siegfried Jung, l’équipage est porté disparu, vraisemblable­ment prisonnier de la carlingue qui repose, désormais, au fond de la mer du Nord [3].
Puis, les Britanniques aperçoivent des bimoteurs [4] plongeant sur des bateaux (16.30). Ce sont en fait les Potez 631 de l’aéronautique navale qui attaquent en piqué des bombardiers s’en prenant à des navires, comme le confirme le capitaine de vaisseau Charles Henri de Levis Mirepoix :
« 16.00, la patrouille d’alerte (Dupont – Domas) décolle contre un bombardier vers Ostende. Cinq minutes après, je décolle en renfort avec Prévost. Nous patrouillons deux heures autour d’Ostende et poursuivons en mer trois appareils [5] que nous n’arrivons pas à rejoindre. Nous ne voyons ni Dupont, ni Domas. Quand nous rentrons, nous apprenons que Dupont et Domas ont été abattus en combat devant Nieuport par des Messerschmitt 110, après avoir descendu eux-mêmes un ou deux ennemis. Seul, le radio Le Thomas (lire QM Jean Bot [6]), blessé, a pu se sauver en parachute. AC 2 assez démoralisée. Dupont était un officier marinier d’élite, très bon chasseur et aimé de tous » (Icare).
Le quartier maître Jean Bot ajoute [7] :
« Au retour, nous apercevons en mer du Nord, au large de La Panne, deux bateaux noirs de monde se dirigeant vers l’Angleterre à grand renfort de sillages… Nous voyons aussi en bonne position, se préparant à les bombarder tranquillement puisque ces navires n’avaient pas de D.C.A., trois bombardiers allemands des Heinkel 111 en file indienne. Nous avons aussitôt engagé le combat. Les avions allemands se séparèrent et larguèrent les bombes à la mer sans toucher les bateaux qui revenaient de loin ! »
Les pilotes du Squadron 248 attaquent les bimoteurs et revendiquent la destruction de deux Messerschmitt 110. Or, aucun appareil de ce type n’est tombé dans ce secteur. Que s’est-il passé ? En fait, les Britanniques ont pris les Potez 631 de l’aéronautique navale pour des Messerschmitt 110 [8] :
« Pendant que le Blenheim « R » poursuivait le Heinkel (lire Junkers 88), le navigateur du « R » attira l’attention du pilote sur un Messerschmitt 110 (lire Potez 631) 2.000 pieds au-dessus et à droite, en train d’effectuer un virage serré, afin de se préparer pour une attaque en piqué. Le pilote du « R » modifia sa course par la droite pour se placer sous l’avion ennemi et pour le forcer à accentuer son plongeon. Au même moment, les deux autres Blenheim changèrent de cap pour attaquer ce Messerschmitt 110 (ibidem) et furent eux-mêmes attaqués par un second Messerschmitt 110.
Ce Messerschmitt 110 (ibidem) réussit à s’échapper, comme le fit un troisième Messerschmitt 110 qui quitta la zone de combat vers l’est à une vitesse très élevée. Le Blenheim « R » vira à droite, et put se soustraire à l’avion ennemi qui, comme un éclair, passa sur le côté gauche. Le « R », immédiatement, tourna à gauche pour se placer dans la queue de l’avion ennemi. Quand le Messerschmitt (ibidem) prit de l’altitude, le Blenheim le poursuivit toujours en grimpant. Le Blenheim « R » déclenchant ces 9 unités de suralimentation, poursuit le Messerschmitt 110 (ibidem) reprenant rapidement de l’altitude jusqu’à près de 9.000 pieds en tirant de temps en temps de courtes rafales. A 8.000 pieds, il vola à l’horizontale et le Blenheim « R » tira de nouveau une rafale ajustée. L’avion ennemi effectuait un demi-tonneau et piqua brutalement vers la mer comme s’il était touché, hors contrôle, mais sortit du plongeon quasi au niveau de la mer, et remonta fortement, toujours suivi de près par le Blenheim.
Le Messerschmitt (ibidem) grimpa à 5.000 pieds et tenta des manœuvres évasives élémentaires par de larges virages à gauche et à droite mais peu efficaces. C’est alors qu’il vira sec par la gauche et le Blenheim tira une longue rafale dans l’avion ennemi à l’endroit où la surface supérieure du plan de l’aile gauche s’assemblait avec le fuselage. Un incendie se déclara à l’intérieur de la cabine et, immédiatement, des flammes tournoyèrent à l’intérieur du cockpit.
Pendant que l’avion ennemi était presque en perte de vitesse, le mitrailleur arrière (quartier maître Jean Bot) rabattit en arrière sa verrière et sortit une jambe sur le côté de l’avion à moitié dans le vide. Les flammes et la fumée l’enveloppèrent lorsqu’il sembla avoir du mal à reprendre quelque chose dans le cockpit. Mais, après quelques secondes, c’est sûr il passa par-dessus bord ; on aperçut son parachute s’ouvrir. On ne sait pas s’il fut capturé.
Mais, maintenant, l’avion était en train de tomber en piqué, les flammes et la fumée noire sortaient abondamment par le cockpit arrière ouvert. Le Blenheim suivit l’avion ennemi en piqué sans tirer et aperçut le pilote (Maître Jean Dupont) lutter avec ses deux mains au-dessus de la tête, essayant d’ouvrir sa verrière. Il n’y arriva pas et son avion pivota et se plaça sur le dos et percuta la mer à un angle abrupt à environ trois miles au large (de Blankenberge [9]). Le Blenheim « R », à ce moment sans munitions, retourna à sa base » (CR Air 50/312 n° 2-3).
Cette méprise coûta la vie à trois aviateurs français [10]. Le quartier maître Jean Bot s’en sort mais à quel prix ! :
« Dupont ayant complètement vidé ses chargeurs, partit chercher la protection de la côte et de la D.C.A. amie et me demanda de recharger les armes (…).
Je plongeai littéralement dans le poste central pour recharger la mitrailleuse et le canon de vingt millimètres de Dupont. Conscient du risque couru pendant cette opération qui laissait notre avion sans surveillance à l’arrière, je m’y étais entraîné plusieurs fois et je le fis évidemment le plus rapidement possible.
Malgré cela, lorsque je repris mon poste, j’eus la désagréable surprise de voir qu’un appareil allemand (un Junkers 88, en fait, lire Blenheim) avait déjà ouvert le feu sur nous. Dupont n’ayant pu le voir venir, il avait déjà terriblement bien réglé son tir. Deux mitrailleuses nous tiraient dessus, chacun d’elles (on voit très bien le tracé des balles) semblant se charger de chacun de nos deux moteurs.
A mon tour, j’accrochai le Junkers 88 (ibidem) à la mitrailleuse mais il me sembla que mes balles ricochaient sur le cockpit de plexiglass constituant l’avant du Junkers 88 (ibidem). Aussi, je m’efforçai d’atteindre plutôt les réservoirs d’essence entre la carlingue et les moteurs.
A ce moment, l’Allemand se mit à tirer au canon et plusieurs projectiles touchèrent notre Potez. Dans le téléphone intérieur, j’entendis Dupont dire : Maman ! puis ce fut le silence. J’appelai par l’interphone mais rien ne répondit. D’autres coups frappèrent le Potezdésemparé et je fus touché aux pieds.
Baissant les yeux, je vis du sang partout et des flammes lécher le fuselage. Déjà, ses deux moteurs en feu, l’avion piquait vers le sol. J’eus beaucoup de mal à me dégager du fait de la pression de l’air l’avion piquant à quelques 600 kilomètre à l’heure, mais je réussis à sauter et à ouvrir mon parachute.
Ce fut alors le grand silence dans le ciel. Je descendais vers la plage de La Panne qui était couverte de monde, civils ou militaire belges, français, anglais et hollandais. J’entendis des balles siffler autour de moi. C’était une sensation nouvelle car en combat aérien, enfermé dans les avions, on n’entend pas les balles. Je cherchai des yeux l’avion qui me mitraillait mais je n’en vis aucun, le ciel était vide. Je compris que les coups de feu étaient tirés du sol. On me prenait peut-être pour un parachutiste allemand. Même si cela avait été le cas, seul je n’aurais pas été bien dangereux ! Les coups de feu continuèrent pendant toute ma descente et mon parachute était criblé de balles à tel point qu’à la fin, je n’osais plus le regarder ! Une vraie passoire… Après avoir joué des suspentes pour éviter la chute à la mer d’abord, puis sur les hôtels de La Panne ensuite, je me recroquevillai pour un roulé-boulé quand une balle me traversa le poignet gauche.
Enfin, je pris pied sur le sable et je criai que j’étais un aviateur français, ce qui ne m’a pas empêché de recevoir un coup de pied au visage, décoché violemment à l’œil droit par un civil pendant que mon parachute me traînait sur le sable. Sans un lieutenant belge qui m’a littéralement fait prisonnier avec sa section et m’a ensuite protégé et transporté jusqu’à l’Hôtel de l’Océan, j’allais me faire lyncher !
Derrière moi, l’avion était tombé dans les flots avec le malheureux Dupont. J’avais vu l’empennage du Potezdisparaître à mes yeux au moment précis où mon parachute s’était ouvert. Notre avion s’est englouti quasiment à la verticale, tandis que celui de Domas avait donné l’impression d’hydroplaner un peu. Aucun parachute dans le ciel, personne à la surface de l’eau (…). »
Quelle tristesse !, mais nous le répétons, l’identification des avions en combat aérien est très difficile et les méprises entre le Potez 631 et le Messerschmitt 110 furent malheureusement monnaie courante [11] !

[1] Nous avons ici traduit le nom de ce navire qui s’appelait en réalité le « Artic Hunter ».

[2] Effectivement le Squadron 248 ne revendique pas cet appareil.

[3] A bord, on trouve le Lt Siegfried Jung (FF, P captivité française), le Gefr Winfried Mebus (Bombesch., ?), l’Obgefr Theo König (Bf, ?) et le Flg Otto Barthels (Bsch, ?).

[4] Les Britanniques identifient ces appareils comme des Messerschmitt 110.

[5] Il s’agit probablement des trois Blenheim du Squadron 248 qui effectue la même mission que les Français (voir plus loin).

[6] Nous sommes en contact avec monsieur Jean Bot qui est le seul survivant de ce combat.

[7] Voir lettre de monsieur Jean Bot du 30 avril 2004 et le rapport de la conversation téléphonique du 5 mai 2004 (archives Gillet).

[8] Les Britanniques et les Français donnent de nombreux éléments concordants qui confortent notre hypothèse d’une malheureuse méprise de la part des Britanniques.

[9] Jean Bot précise : « Je peux certifier que je me suis posé en parachute sur la plage de La Panne à cinquante mètres environ d’un hôtel où j’ai été ausculté une première fois avant d’être transporté en civière à l’hôtel de l’Océan. D’après Monsieur Dupont père, que j’ai vu entre Noël 1943 et le 1er janvier 1944, notre avion a été repéré et balisé à cinq cent mètres environ de l’hôtel premier cité. Mais, toujours d’après monsieur Dupont père, la balise a été arrachée par la tempête en septembre 1940 et les autorités allemandes n’ont plus autorisé la reprise des recherches par la suite » (lettre du 30 avril 2004, archives Gillet).

[10] Il s’agit incontestablement des deux Potez 631 de l’aéronautique navale abattus par le Squadron 248. Les Français identifièrent les Blenheim comme des Messerschmitt 110 ou Junkers 88 pour Jean Bot (unique survivant). Ce dernier certifie seulement que le nez de l’avion avait une verrière ce qui est le cas du Blenheim. Nous excluons le Junkers 88. En effet, nous imaginons mal un bombardier à la poursuite d’un avion de chasse.
Evidemment nous sommes stupéfaits par cette méprise. Les aviateurs à bord des Blenheim ont attaqué de près. Pourquoi n’ont-ils pas vu les couleurs françaises ? Il y a deux explications. D’abord en combat aérien, l’identification des avions est beaucoup plus difficile pour de nombreuses raisons qu’il serait trop long d’expliquer ici. Il existe aussi une autre possibilité toute simple. Les Français en infériorité numérique dans ce secteur ont pu légèrement masqué les cocardes comme l’avait fait Marin-la-Meslée sur son Curtiss n° 217. D’après le quartier-maître Jean Bot, les cocardes n’ont pas été masquées. Il a assisté à l’amerrissage de fortune du Potez de Domas : « L’avion apparemment intact de Domas venait de s’abîmer en mer. Je ne vis personne en sortir, ce qui m’a fait supposer que tous deux, Domas et Le Thomas avaient été grièvement blessés, tués peut-être, par la riposte des Heinkel pendant notre attaque. »

[11] Monsieur Lucien Morareau, spécialiste de l’aéronautique navale écrit : « … je me suis souvenu des entretiens que j’avais eu avec messieurs Billottet, Andrès, Cassé, Didion, Seguin, Graignic, Maulandi, etc… anciens pilotes aux AC 1 et AC 2, pour la plupart disparus maintenant. Il m’avait semblé à l’époque qu’ils n’avaient pas très envie d’évoquer les circonstances de la disparition de Domas et Dupont… et, avec le recul du temps, je me demande s’ils n’étaient pas en fait au courant de ce qui s’était réellement passé, mais ne souhaitaient pas en dire plus ? »


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:47.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004 - 2018, 12oclockhigh.net