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Old 2nd April 2022, 09:23
Simon Trew Simon Trew is offline
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Conversations between Luftwaffe prisoners - summer 1944 summary

Hello,

First, my thanks to the forum owner and moderator(s) for facilitating my membership of this forum.

By way of expressing my gratitude, please see below a summary of the content of conversations between Luftwaffe prisoners monitored by the Allies during summer 1944. Possibly this sort of thing has been made available on this forum before, in which case I apologise for duplicating effort. Still, if this is a useful summary to some people, I hope it it will be interesting to at least a few forum users.

The extract below comes from an appendix to a chapter in my forthcoming (probably late 2022, self-published) bibliography / source guide to the German perspective on the Normandy campaign. Normandy 1944 is my main research interest. The bibliography consists of nine chapters plus numerous appendices. Chapter 9, plus three appendices, focus on the Luftwaffe role in the campaign.

Anyway, here's the relevant stuff:

AIR 40/3096


SRA 5323 7 June Conversation between a Ju 88 pilot from KG 2 (see SRA 5170), a Ju 188 pilot from KG 6 (see SRA 5273) and a Ju 290 observer from FAG 5 (captured 26 May), in which they discuss engine performance and features of the Ju 290 maritime patrol aircraft.
SRA 5326 7 June Conversation between a Ju 188 pilot from KG 6 (see SRA 5273) and a Ju 290 observer from FAG 5 (see SRA 5323) in which they discuss the effects of jettisonable bomb racks on aircraft performance.
SRA 5330 10 June An NCO from 12th Coy, 3rd Luftwaffe Signals Regt (captured 6 June) makes various defeatist remarks.
SRA 5331 10 June A Ju 88 wireless operator from ZG 1 (captured 7 June) describes in some detail his experiences on 6 and 7 June, including being shot down.
SRA 5332 11 June An He 177 crewman from KG 40 (captured 9 June) mentions the effects of Allied air attacks on his airfield.
SRA 5333 10 June An NCO from 12th Coy, 3rd Luftwaffe Signals Regt (captured 7 June) describes his personal experiences on D-Day and D+1.
SRA 5334 11 June An Me Bf 109 pilot from 6./JG 11 (captured 7 June) describes the achievements of one of his colleagues.
SRA 5335 10 June A Ju 88 wireless operator from ZG 1 (see SRA 5331) describes some personal experiences, his staffel’s organisation and its losses on 6-7 June.
SRA 5336 10 June A Ju 88 wireless operator from ZG 1 (see SRA 5331) describes features of the fighter variant of his aircraft and some of his combat experiences.
SRA 5337 11 June A Ju 88 wireless operator from ZG 1 (see SRA 5331) describes low-level flying techniques used in attacks on convoys.
SRA 5338 11 June Conversation between an NCO from 12th Coy, 3rd Luftwaffe Signals Regt and a Ju 88 wireless operator from ZG 1 (both captured 7 June) in which they discuss wireless and direction-finding techniques.
SRA 5339 12 June A Ju 88 wireless operator from ZG 1 (see SRA 5331) describes his training and the organisational relationship between KG 40 and ZG 1.
SRA 5342 13 June A Ju 88 wireless operator from ZG 1(see SRA 5331) describes the very limited advance warning his unit had regarding the invasion.
SRA 5343 13 June A Ju 88 wireless operator from ZG 1 (see SRA 5331) describes tactics used in aerial combat and the capabilities of his own type of aircraft.
SRA 5344 13 June An He 177 observer from KG 40 (captured 11 June) complains about the failure of the German air-sea rescue service.
SRA 5345 15 June A Ju 88 wireless operator from ZG 1 (see SRA 5331) speculates on the Luftwaffe order of battle in France.
SRA 5346 16 June A member of 3rd Luftwaffe Signals Regt (captured 8 June) describes the activities of his direction-finding unit.
SRA 5350 16 June Conversation between an He 177 crewman from KG 40 and an NCO from a Luftwaffe ground unit (both captured 10 June) in which both make defeatist remarks about the situation in Normandy and elsewhere.
SRA 5351 16 June An He 177 crewman from KG 40 (captured 10 June) describes features of his air base and notes that his unit uses guided bombs.
SRA 5352 16 June An He 177 crewman from KG 40 (see SRA 5351) describes the effectiveness of Allied searchlights.
SRA 5353 16 June An Me Bf 109 pilot from 6./JG 11 (see SRA 5334) describes how an entire gruppe of fighters can become airborne in less than a minute if emergency take-off procedures are used.
SRA 5356 17 June An NCO from a Luftwaffe ground unit (captured 10 June) provides a detailed description of direction-finding activities carried out by his unit.
SRA 5358 23 June Conversation between an Me Bf 109 pilot from 6./JG 11 and a Fw 190 pilot from 3./JG 2 (both captured 7 June) in which they describe flying characteristics of the latest type of Me Bf 109 and also those of the Me 262 jet aircraft.
SRA 5362 23 June Conversation between an Me Bf 109 pilot from 6./JG 11 and a Fw 190 pilot from 3./JG 2 (see SRA 5358) in which they discuss their combat experiences and how to get the maximum performance from their aircraft.
SRA 5363 23 June An Fw 190 pilot from 3./JG 2 (captured 7 June) briefly describes his experiences in low-level attacks against Allied shipping on 6-7 June.
SRA 5364 23 June Conversation between an Me Bf 109 pilot from 6./JG 11 and a Fw 190 pilot from 3./JG 2 (see SRA 5358) in which they describe the achievements of various pilots with whom they are familiar.
SRA 5365 23 June Conversation between an Me Bf 109 pilot from 6./JG 11 and a Fw 190 pilot from 3./JG 2 (see SRA 5358) in which they discuss their units’ achievements before and on D-Day.
SRA 5366 18 June A series of very technical explanations from a member of 3rd Luftwaffe Signals Regt (captured 8 June).
SRA 5371 19 June A series of very technical explanations from a member of 3rd Luftwaffe Signals Regt (see SRA 5366).
SRA 5375 21 June A Ju 88 wireless operator from 1./KG 66 (captured 11 June) describes techniques used to achieve the accurate location of bomber targets.
SRA 5383 23 June An He 177 crewman from KG 40 (captured 11 June) describes the Me 262 aircraft, features of the Hs 293 guided bomb and minor aspects of Operation ‘Steinbock’.
SRA 5385 24 June An Me Bf 109 pilot from 9./JG 3 (captured 7 June) describes his D-Day transfer from Germany to France and his earlier experiences flying the Me 262 jet aircraft.
SRA 5387 25 June An officer from 8th Company, 53rd Luftwaffe Signals Regt (captured 17 June) describes his experiences during the defence of the Douvres radar station strongpoint.
SRA 5388 24 June A Ju 88 wireless operator from 9./KG 26 (captured 19 June) makes defeatist remarks about the weakness of the Luftwaffe in France.
SRA 5394 26 June A Ju 88 pilot from 7./KG 26 (captured 23 June) describes torpedo-bomber tactics and the heavy losses sustained during low-level flying training.
SRA 5395 25 June An Fw 190 pilot from 6./JG 1 (captured 22 June) describes expectations of fighter reinforcements for operations in the West, and clarifies the purpose of his final flight.
SRA 5396 26 June An Fw 190 pilot from 4./JG 2 (captured 23 June) describes the heavy losses suffered by his gruppe during the opening stages of the Normandy campaign.
SRA 5397 25 June Conversation between fighter pilots from 6./JG 11, 6./JG 1 and 4./JG 2 (captured 7, 22 and 23 June respectively) in which they compare the flying characteristics of Fw 190 and Me Bf 109 aircraft.

AIR 40/3097

SRA 5400 26 June A Ju 88 pilot from 3./KG 77 (captured 23 June) describes how smoke screens seriously hamper torpedo attacks on Allied shipping.
SRA 5403 27 June An Fw 190 pilot from 6./JG 1 (see SRA 5395) provides information about his unit’s organisation.
SRA 5404 28 June Conversation between Fw 190 pilots from 7./JG 51, 6./JG 1 and 4./JG 2 (captured 20, 22 and 23 June respectively) in which they discuss aerial dog-fighting tactics against Spitfire and Thunderbolt fighters
SRA 5414 30 June A Ju 88 pilot from 7./KG 26 (see SRA 5394) discusses the flying speed and range of his aircraft, which he also says uses rocket-assisted take-off (see SRA 5429 below).
SRA 5419 1 July Conversation between an Me Bf 109 pilot from 9./JG 3 (captured 7 June) and an Fw 190 pilot from 6./JG 1 (see SRA 5395) in which they discuss readiness states in their two units.
SRA 5422 2 July A Ju 188 air gunner from 3.(F)/122 (captured 23 June) clarifies the meaning of code words and arrangements for ground – air coordination during interception missions.
SRA 5425 3 July A Ju 188 wireless operator from 1./KG 2 (captured 29 June) notes that being based in Holland is preferable to being in Germany, since the latter is devastated and there is little to do outside work.
SRA 5426 3 July A Ju 188 air gunner from 3.(F)/122 (see SRA 5422) describes the features of his gun position in the aircraft’s belly.
SRA 5429 3 July A Ju 88 pilot from 7./KG 26 (see SRA 5394) describes the methods used in rocket-assisted take-off. He also clarifies losses and replacements in his gruppe since 6 June, and claims that torpedo-bombers have vindicated themselves since D-Day.
SRA 5434 3 July An officer from a ground unit at Cherbourg (captured 26 June) describes techniques used to jam enemy night fighter radars.
SRA 5438 4 July Conversation between two Ju 188 aircrew, one from 3./KG 6 and the other from 1./KG 2 (captured 24 and 29 June respectively), in which they discuss their units’ equipment and the award of decorations for flights over England.
SRA 5442 6 July A Ju 188 air gunner from 3.(F)/122 (see SRA 5422) describes the engines used by his aircraft.

(From this point on, prisoners were no longer referred to in monitoring reports by serial numbers, but by using their real names. This explains the shift in identification below.)

SRA 5456 15 July Leutnant Zink, an Me Bf 109 pilot from III./JG 3 (captured 11 June), speculates on the imminent use of the Me 262 as a fighter and bomber, and claims it will make a major difference to the air war.
SRA 5460 16 July Leutnant Zink (see SRA 5456) complains about the overwhelming strength of Allied air power and the lack of trained and experienced Luftwaffe pilots. He also provides some information on his geschwader’s organisation and the characteristics of the ‘Mistel’ composite aircraft.
SRA 5463 14 July Conversation between Leutnant Keller, a Do 217 pilot from KG 100 (captured 4 July) and Oberleutnant Michalec, an Me Bf 109 reconnaissance pilot from NAG 14 (captured 11 July), in which they discuss problems in cooperating with fighter escorts. Michalec also describes his unit’s attempts to take air photographs of shipping in Portsmouth harbour before the invasion. Keller provides details of the Hs 293 guided bomb and claims it can be used as a remote-control device against massed Allied bomber formations.
SRA 5464 14 July Conversation between Leutnant Keller and Oberleutnant Michalec (see SRA 5463) in which various matters are discussed, the most interesting being Keller’s complaint about a lack of fuel for his unit’s motor vehicles.
SRA 5465 15 July Obergefreiter Olze, a Ju 88 wireless operator from 7./NJG 2 (captured 13 July), describes how his aircraft became hopelessly lost during a night sortie and landed by mistake in England.
SRA 5466 15 July Obergefreiter Olze (see SRA 5465) describes methods used (including ground control intercept) to locate enemy aircraft while carrying out night fighter missions.
SRA 5467 15 July Unteroffizier Mäckle, a Ju 88 night fighter pilot from 7./NJG 2 (captured 13 July), describes why he had to carry out an emergency landing in England. He also discusses features of his training, the threat posed by RAF night fighters, his unit’s organisation and methods used to locate and intercept enemy aircraft.
SRA 5468 15 July Unteroffizier Mäckle (see SRA 5467) describes in detail the sequence of events involved in launching a sortie and landing at the end of it. He also discusses the threat posed by enemy night fighters and by bombing attacks on airfields, which sometimes occur while sorties are taking place.
SRA 5472 16 July Leutnant Keller (see SRA 5463) briefly describes maintenance procedures in his unit.
SRA 5474 18 July Leutnant Keller (see SRA 5463) describes the effects of an Allied air raid on Blagnac airfield, and also the detrimental effects on aircraft of carrying out too much ground taxi-ing.
SRA 5480 15 July Unteroffizier Mäckle (see SRA 5467) describes fighter control techniques and how landings are carried out through dense cloud. He also explains the meaning of some German code-words.
SRA 5481 18 July Unteroffizier Mäckle (see SRA 5467) describes the technical characteristics of his Ju 88 night fighter, especially its on-board locating devices.
SRA 5482 18 July Obergefreiter Olze (see SRA 5465) describes how enemy jamming attempts are frustrated.
SRA 5483 17 July Leutnant Zink (see SRA 5456) provides some rather outdated information about the Luftwaffe fighter order of battle in the West.
SRA 5485 20 July Conversation between Fähnrich Befeldt, an Me Bf 109 pilot from 8./JG 3, and Unteroffizier Orend, an Me Bf 109 pilot from Stab I./JG 5 (captured 11 and 13 July respectively), in which they discuss the performance of their fighter aircraft.
SRA 5486 20 July Conversation between Fähnrich Befeldt and Unteroffizier Orend (see SRA 5485), in which they discuss various German aircraft designs.
SRA 5487 21 July Unteroffizier Wich-Fähndrich, an Me Bf 109 pilot from 3./JG 27 (captured 19 July), describes losses in his staffel since it arrived in Normandy in June.
SRA 5489 22 July Leutnant Wania, an Fw 190 pilot from 4./JG 2 (captured 20 June), briefly describes anti-shipping and ground attack missions in which he was involved.
SRA 5492 22 July Feldwebel Gromill, an Me Bf 109 night fighter pilot from 3./JG 301 (captured 21 July), describes his experiences carrying out anti-bomber sorties at night.
SRA 5493 22 July Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) describes his experience flying as escort for a ‘Mistel’ attack in the English Channel.
SRA 5494 22 July Unteroffizier Stuckenbrock, an Fw 190 pilot from 6./JG 1 (captured 20 July), describes pre-invasion operations against Allied bombers and also clarifies losses in his gruppe during May 1944.
SRA 5496 21 July Oberleutnant Michalec (see SRA 5463) describes his Me Bf 109’s characteristics, especially its reconnaissance role in taking aerial photographs, and suggests that the Fw 190 would be better suited to the task.
SRA 5497 22 July Oberleutnant Michalec (see SRA 5463) describes having witnessed early trials of the Me 262 jet aircraft.
SRA 5498 22 July Oberleutnant Michalec (see SRA 5463) describes how he was ordered by his CO to reveal nothing to Allied interrogators if he was captured.

AIR 40/3098

SRA 5504 26 July Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) describes how his gruppe’s aircraft are dispersed and camouflaged at several different airfields.
SRA 5506 23 July Unteroffizier Kupprion, a Ju 88 wireless operator from 3./KG 66 (captured 17 July), describes methods used to locate targets, and the effectiveness of enemy jamming measures.
SRA 5507 25 July Unteroffizier Hopfgartner, a Do 217 wireless operator from KG 100 (captured 21 July), provides some information about his geschwader’s organisation.
SRA 5509 23 July Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) describes techniques for detecting and locating enemy jamming aircraft, and methods of night fighter control.
SRA 5510 23 July Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) provides quite a detailed description of the ‘Mistel’ composite aircraft and describes watching it being used against Allied invasion shipping.
SRA 5511 24 July Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) describes shooting down two Lancaster bombers during a night-time sortie near Dieppe (on 8-9 July).
SRA 5515 23 July Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) describes instances of combat avoidance among Luftwaffe night fighter pilots.
SRA 5516 23 July Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) describes methods of night fighter control.
SRA 5517 23 July Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) provides a detailed description of his flying routine, with particular emphasis on how he carried out night-time landings.
SRA 5518 23 July Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) provides a detailed description of his geschwader’s organisation and losses, the location of its airfields, names of key commanders and information about night fighter control methods.
SRA 5519 23 July Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) admits that among the items in his possession when he was captured was a map on which bomber defence zones were marked, and that this is now in the possession of his interrogating officer.
SRA 5525 28 July Unteroffizier Wunsch, a Ju 188 wireless operator from 1./KG 6 (captured 20 July), describes methods of dropping mines into the Bay of the Seine. Judging by his description, these were pressure-activated ‘Oyster’ mines.
SRA 5526 26 July Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) describes his fighter aircraft’s enhanced engine performance.
SRA 5530 27 July Unteroffizier Hopfgartner (see SRA 5507) states that all of III./KG 100 has been transferred to Blagnac.
SRA 5531 26 July Unteroffizier Kupprion (see SRA 5506) states that any aircrew from his unit (KG 66) who were not pilots could apply to be re-trained as fighter pilots. He discusses the possibility of massive fighter reinforcements arriving imminently in the West from Germany.
SRA 5537 30 July Unteroffizier Winkler, a Ju 88 pilot from 6./KG 26 (captured 27 July) describes the heavy expenditure of aircraft tyres in his unit, the shortage of aviation fuel and low morale among aircrew.
SRA 5538 30 July Unteroffizier Winkler (see SRA 5537) describes French partisan activity in the area around his airfield, and the use of his own unit in frequent anti-guerrilla dive-bombing operations.
SRA 5546 1 Aug Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) describes the achievements of his gruppe in night-time operations.
SRA 5547 2 Aug Unteroffizier Vogel, an Me Bf 109 pilot from 8./JG 1 (captured 22 July) makes a few brief remarks on the ‘Mistel’ composite aircraft.
SRA 5548 3 Aug Unteroffizier Fromke, a Ju 88 observer from 3./KG 66 (captured 1 August) makes a few remarks about the techniques used by his target marking unit.
SRA 5549 1 Aug Unteroffizier Winkler (see SRA 5537) says that the aerial torpedoes used by his unit are set to detonate underneath their target, causing a vessel to break its back.
SRA 5550 31 July Unteroffizier Zimmer, a Ju 88 pilot from 3./KG 26 (captured 27 July), describes his unit’s organisation and some of his recent flying experiences.
SRA 5551 6 Aug Conversation between Obergefreiter Specht, a Ju 88 wireless operator from 8./KG 54 (captured 30 July) and Gefreiter Böhme, a Ju 88 air gunner from 2./KG 30 (captured 3 August), in which they describe various technical and organisational matters, and discuss incidents and consequences of ‘short-bombing’.
SRA 5552 7 Aug Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) and Unteroffizier Salmen, a Ju 88 mechanic from 4./KG 66 (captured 5 August), discuss some airfield occupations.
SRA 5555 4 Aug Unteroffizier Dieck, a Ju 88 wireless operator from 3./KG 66 (captured 31 July), provides a detailed description of the use of target-marking flares by KG 66.
SRA 5556 4 Aug Unteroffizier Dieck (see SRA 5555) describes recent Luftwaffe efforts to recruit bomber aircrew to be re-trained as fighter pilots.
SRA 5559 5 Aug Conversation between Feldwebel Gromill (see SRA 5492) and Feldwebel Junghans, an Me Bf 109 pilot from I./JG 5 (captured 14 July), in which they discuss the suitability of the Fw 190 for night fighter missions.
SRA 5560 5 Aug Feldwebel Junghans (see SRA 5559) makes brief remarks on various subjects, among them the dive performance of the Bf 109 fighter and techniques used during ground-strafing sorties.
SRA 5561 4 Aug Unteroffizier Dieck (see SRA 5555) clarifies the strength of his unit and notes that staffel, gruppe and geschwader commanders are allowed to fly on operations if a specific number of aircraft are involved.
SRA 5562 8 Aug Feldwebel Halbritter, a Ju 188 wireless operator from 4./KG 66 (captured 4 August), provides information about the location and characteristics of the airfield where his unit is based.
SRA 5563 7 Aug Unteroffizier Fromke (see SRA 5548) provides a very detailed description of how navigation instruments installed in his aircraft operate.
SRA 5564 7 Aug Unteroffizier Zimmer (see SRA 5550) and Unteroffizier Dieck (see SRA 5555) discuss the effects of Allied night fighter attacks and how to frustrate them.
SRA 5565 7 Aug Unteroffizier Dieck (see SRA 5555) describes some of the hazards involved in carrying out target-marking sorties.
SRA 5566 9 Aug Unteroffizier Dieck (see SRA 5555) makes a brief comment about 6./KG 54 becoming 6./KG 66.
SRA 5567 8 Aug Unteroffizier Dieck (see SRA 5555) and Unteroffizier Herrmann, an Fw 190 pilot from 10./JG 2 (captured 24 July) discuss the performance of their aircraft.
SRA 5569 13 Aug Feldwebel Halbritter (see SRA 5562) makes some defeatist remarks.
SRA 5570 12 Aug Conversation between Leutnant Raupach, a Ju 88 wireless operator from II./NJG 2 (captured 7 August) and Leutnant Kraml, from 54th Luftwaffe Signals Regt (captured 4 August), in which they discuss methods used to identify and locate friendly aircraft.
SRA 5571 15 Aug Conversation between Oberfeldwebel Reichel, a Ju 88 pilot from 4./KG 6 and Unteroffizier Wöhling, a Ju 88 air gunner from 5./KG 6 (both captured 5 August), in which they describe how He 111 bombers are now being used to air-launch V-1 rocket bombs.
SRA 5572 16 Aug Unteroffizier Rühmkorb, a Ju 88 wireless operator from 6./NJG 2 (captured 8 August) states that unlike in Germany, where operations were directed by ground control intercept, his flights over France involved independent action.
SRA 5573 14 Aug Major Goy, from Stab Jagdfliegerführer 5 (captured 6 August), provides a little information about the number of fighter control centres in France.
SRA 5574 10 Aug Unteroffizier Metzger, a Do 217 observer from 7./KG 100 (captured 6 August), describes some of the characteristics of the He 177 bomber.
SRA 5575 14 Aug Hauptmann Autenrieth, an Me Bf 110 pilot from 6./NJG 4 (captured 5 August), describes in detail the procedures involved in launching night fighter sorties, especially in view of the threat posed by Allied night fighters lurking near German airfields.
SRA 5576 14 Aug Hauptmann Autenrieth (see SRA 5575) provides a very detailed – and surprisingly clear, given some of its technical content – description of night fighter tactics (including ‘Wild Boar’ and ‘Tame Boar’), as well as the tools involved and enemy counter-measures (e.g. jamming).
SRA 5577 14 Aug Hauptmann Autenrieth (see SRA 5575) provides additional information about night fighter tools and tactics, as well as the methods used to mount sorties some distance from a unit’s home airfield.
SRA 5578 14 Aug Hauptmann Autenrieth (see SRA 5575) states that there has always been sufficient aviation fuel to allow sorties to be mounted, even if there is a shortage at training schools.
SRA 5580 18 Aug Conversation between Unteroffizier Rühmkorb (see SRA 5572) and Unteroffizier Helbig, a Ju 88 air gunner from 6./NJG 4 (captured 4 August), in which they compare their personal experiences.
SRA 5584 21 Aug Unteroffizier Speichert, an Me Bf 109 pilot from 9./JG 26 (captured 16 August), describes some of his personal experiences during the Normandy campaign.
SRA 5586 25 Aug Conversation between Leutnant Warthol, an Me Bf 109 reconnaissance pilot from 5.(F)/123 (captured 16 August) and Leutnant Ottnad, an Me Bf 109 pilot from 8./JG 27 (captured 18 August), in which they discuss new models of aircraft, especially the Me 262.
SRA 5587 23 Aug Unteroffizier Wagner, a Ju 88 wireless operator from KG 54 (captured 3 August), describes how he managed to take off from a badly damaged airfield at the start of August.
SRA 5588 25 Aug Unteroffizier Rühmkorb (see SRA 5572) describes the use of a ‘shadow airfield’ near Coulommiers.
SRA 5589 25 Aug Unteroffizier Rühmkorb (see SRA 5572) describes various devices installed in night fighters to help locate enemy aircraft.
SRA 5590 26 Aug Unteroffizier Rühmkorb (see SRA 5572) describes the ‘Naxos’, ‘Flensburg’ and other devices installed in German night fighters to help locate and track enemy aircraft.
SRA 5591 26 Aug Unteroffizier Rühmkorb (see SRA 5572) describes methods used by the Luftwaffe for controlling its night fighter operations.
SRA 5592 26 Aug Unteroffizier Rühmkorb (see SRA 5572) describes the tasks that he has to perform as a member of a night fighter crew.
SRA 5593 27 Aug Unteroffizier Rühmkorb (see SRA 5572) describes features of NJG 2’s organisation.
SRA 5595 27 Aug Unteroffizier Rühmkorb (see SRA 5572) provides additional information about night fighter organisation in France and procedures used in mounting sorties.
SRA 5596 28 Aug Unteroffizier Rühmkorb (see SRA 5572) describes methods of night fighter control (i.e. ground commentary).
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Old 2nd April 2022, 13:05
gedburke3 gedburke3 is offline
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Re: Conversations between Luftwaffe prisoners - summer 1944 summary

Welcome to the forum Simon and thanks for a great first posting.
Kind regards
Gerry
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Old 2nd April 2022, 23:42
leonventer leonventer is online now
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Re: Conversations between Luftwaffe prisoners - summer 1944 summary

Quote:
Originally Posted by gedburke3 View Post
Welcome to the forum Simon and thanks for a great first posting.
I'll second that!

I'm curious how much detail your book will contain about each of the listed conversations. It appears AIR 40 has not yet been digitized, so would one have to visit KEW or order it from their website to read them in full?

Thanks,
Leon Venter
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Old 3rd April 2022, 07:56
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Nick Beale Nick Beale is offline
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Re: Conversations between Luftwaffe prisoners - summer 1944 summary

Quote:
Originally Posted by leonventer View Post
It appears AIR 40 has not yet been digitized, so would one have to visit KEW or order it from their website to read them in full?

Thanks,
Leon Venter
Yes, one would. There is so much of this material, spanning the whole war and all the German armed services, that ordering from the website would be a very expensive business.

In his book »Soldaten«, Sönke Neitzel said that his team had indexed all these reports (and copied them? I don’t remember now) but as far as I know, his index isn’t generally available. It would save a lot of time if it was.

P.S. IIRC Neitzel also thought he was the first to use these reports as a source but he was wrong about that.
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Old 3rd April 2022, 09:22
Simon Trew Simon Trew is offline
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Re: Conversations between Luftwaffe prisoners - summer 1944 summary

Thanks for the replies.

Leon,

I'm afraid that what I have included in my post is the full extent of my summary of each monitored conversation transcript. As you probably know, some of the transcripts are very short - a few sentences only. Others are very long (five or six single line-spaced pages, several thousand words). If I tried to be more detailed in my summary, the project would probably never get finished.

The stuff I cut and paste into my post comes from Appendix C to Chapter Nine of my bibliography. Appendix C includes not only summaries of Normandy-related material, but also a rather longer list of monitoring reports relating to Operation Steinbock. Altogether, Appendix C currently runs at 31 pages of A4 (around 14000 words).

Appendix B to the same chapter summarises DEFE 3 signals for June, July and August 1944 that deal with the Luftwaffe in Normandy. These are one-line summaries - again, something more detailed would take many months to produce. That appendix currently runs at 89 pages (51500 words). Here is the introduction and the first few entries (note, the remark about Bold and italicised entries is meaningless as the formatting on this posting doesn't seem to reproduce what exists in the original document):

Appendix B: DEFE 3 signals about Luftwaffe operations

This section of the bibliography describes the principal content of about 4000 signals that were sent to Allied field commands by British intelligence services during the Normandy campaign, and which are preserved in the DEFE 3 and HW 5 series in the UK National Archives. The appendix focuses on material that casts light on the Luftwaffe’s activities in the West during summer 1944, with particular reference to operations by flying units and flak formations. There are also many references to logistical matters, airfield serviceability and other subjects.

In the table below, signals are listed in their numerical-chronological sequence, rather than according to any other criterion. Coverage starts on 5 June 1944 and continues to the end of August. Generally speaking, priority is given to describing signals that are concerned primarily with aspects of the Normandy campaign. Attention is also given to operations by units based in the south of France (from 2. Fliegerdivision), some of which participated in anti-shipping operations off the Normandy coast. However, some material relating to operations in the French interior, and over the western Mediterranean, is omitted, since it seems peripheral to the contents of this bibliography.

A conscientious attempt was made to examine every one of the 12,000+ signals sent during the Normandy campaign, but it is likely that a few relevant items escaped my attention. Also, because I have sought to describe the principal content of each signal in a very limited space, my descriptions may be neither as detailed nor as helpful as some readers would wish. I hope nevertheless that enough information is provided to make this appendix of value to its intended users.

(For additional information about the origins and contents of DEFE 3 and HW 5 intelligence records, see Chapter 9, sections 2.1.1. and 2.1.2. See also sections 5.1.1. and 8.1.1. of the same chapter for information about related Luftwaffe material held in the UK National Archives.)

N.B. In the left-hand column of the table below, each signal is presented using either italics or bold characters as a form of emphasis. This is intended to indicate to readers whether or not the signal is referenced in F. H. (‘Harry’) Hinsley’s British Intelligence in the Second World War, Its Influence on Strategy and Operations: Volume Three, Part II (H.M.S.O., London 1988, chapters 46-48, chapter 51 and appendices 17 and 18), which is the most important published source that previously made use of the material summarised here. In cases where italics are used, the signal in question was described in the book and a footnote was used by the authors to indicate this fact. In cases where bold characters are used, however, it was not. Judging by the information presented below, it seems reasonable to assume that readers of Hinsley’s book may be unfamiliar with the contents of a very large proportion of the signals summarised in this appendix. For students of the Normandy campaign, this indicates that despite the great value of the work carried out by Hinsley and his team, close examination of the contents of the DEFE 3 series is still likely to reveal a considerable amount of interesting new material.

File and signal number Time and date signal sent to Allied field command Summary of signal’s principal contents

DEFE 3/166

KV 6561 0412 hrs 6 June Air operations Brittany 5 June
KV 6579 0704 hrs 6 June Rennes airfield unserviceable for night landing
KV 6606 1259 hrs 6 June X. Fliegerkorps aircraft & crew strength 4 June
KV 6619 1433 hrs 6 June 2.(F)/122 recce report evening 5 June
KV 6624 1404 hrs 6 June (F)/123 and NAG 13 recce tasks a.m. 6 June
KV 6627 1630 hrs 6 June Some flak details 27 May – 1 June
KV 6629 1642 hrs 6 June III./SG 4 arriving Laval 6 June
KV 6632 1651 hrs 6 June III Flak Corps to protect Evreux airfield 6 June
KV 6637 1854 hrs 6 June III./JG 3 aircraft & crew strength 5 June
KV 6638 1925 hrs 6 June X. Fliegerkorps intentions for evening 6 June
KV 6639 1853 hrs 6 June NAG 13 at Dinard on 6 June
KV 6642 1747 hrs 6 June IX. Fliegerkorps intentions for night 6-7 June
KV 6647 2041 hrs 6 June Luftflotte 3’s D-Day response (JG 1 & JG 3)
KV 6653 2109 hrs 6 June French airfield serviceability on 6 June
KV 6655 2118 hrs 6 June Plan to evacuate Carpiquet (Caen) airfield
KV 6662 2203 hrs 6 June Location of II./JG 53 on 28 May
KV 6667 2232 hrs 6 June Fighter control arrangements at Dreux 2 June
KV 6668 2236 hrs 6 June II./JG 2 joins JG 1 on 5 June
KV 6670 2325 hrs 6 June Arrangements for use of NAG 13 from 6 June
KV 6671 2344 hrs 6 June IX. Fliegerkorps intentions for night 6-7 June
KV 6673 2347 hrs 6 June OKL aviation fuel conservation orders 5 June

As for Chapter 9 (primary and secondary sources relating to the Luftwaffe in Normandy and also pre-invasion operations from January to 5 June 1944), that is fairly complete, but I'm hoping for some advice about missing items from people who are more expert on Luftwaffe operations than I am (my main area of expertise, if I dare to call it that, lies in land warfare). Once the gaps are filled, it will probably be publishable. Currently, it runs at 127 pages (around 60,000 words) - operations by Luftwaffe ground forces in Normandy are dealt with in a separate chapter and Chapter 9 is only about the activities of flying and flak units.

Appendix A is the one I am yet to write. That deals with TNA HW 5 sources. But I still need to look at some of those files and then collate the material.

Anyway, thanks for your interest and hopefully this clarifies issues a bit further.

Best,

Simon
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Old 3rd April 2022, 09:26
Simon Trew Simon Trew is offline
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Re: Conversations between Luftwaffe prisoners - summer 1944 summary

Sorry, I meant to add that Ref. Sonke Neitzel's project, my understanding is that his team was very well funded and that they accumulated digital copies of a vast quantity of material from US and UK archives that supported numerous research dissertations and subsequent publications as well as Prof Neitzel's two books. I have no idea, however, if there is any plan ever to make that material widely accessible, either for free or on a payment basis.

I am seeing Sonke in about ten days and I will ask him about this matter.

Simon
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Old 4th April 2022, 01:50
richdlc richdlc is offline
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Re: Conversations between Luftwaffe prisoners - summer 1944 summary

fascinating post Simon, and I will buy a copy of your book!
Anything about the He 219 in there?
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Old 4th April 2022, 06:02
leonventer leonventer is online now
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Re: Conversations between Luftwaffe prisoners - summer 1944 summary

Hi Simon and Nick,

Thanks very much for your detailed and helpful responses.

Quote:
I'm afraid that what I have included in my post is the full extent of my summary of each monitored conversation transcript.
That's understandable. Trying to include more would no doubt have required multiple volumes! Nevertheless, your listing is very effective and useful in indicating what resources are available, and stimulating interest in researching them.

I hadn't looked at Neitzel's "Frontsoldaten" and "Tapping Hitler's Generals" in ages, so I got them off the shelf -- a nice rediscovery... And, as Nick suggested, I should also make my pilgrimage to the National Archives in Kew and D.C. (only been to Freiburg thus far.)
It'd be great if Sönke were to publish more of his trove (nearly 800 pages from Kew, and double that amount from D.C.), so please let us know.

All the best with your upcoming book -- looking forward to it!

Regards,
Leon Venter
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Old 4th April 2022, 09:16
Simon Trew Simon Trew is offline
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Re: Conversations between Luftwaffe prisoners - summer 1944 summary

Thanks again for feedback.

richdlc - I fear I will disappoint you on the subject of the He 219. Unless I am badly mistaken, the aircraft had a fairly peripheral role during the Normandy campaign. I'm not saying that Luftwaffe night fighter operations from early June to late August in connection with the Normandy campaign were unimportant; in fact, I think this is probably a subject that deserves much more attention than it has received. But my understanding (possibly misunderstanding!) is that units equipped with the He 219 were not much involved in night operations over the broader Normandy 'battle space.' Consequently, my bibliography is more than thin on that subject.

I'm reproducing below the section from the bibliography (i.e. from Chapter 9) that focuses on night fighter operations during summer 1944. In addition, I'm including an entry from another part of the same chapter that identifies an important intelligence source (known, I'm sure to most users of this forum who share this interest). I hope you will understand that I can't reproduce great chunks of the chapter or its appendices, for the fairly simple reason that I've spent a huge amount of time on the bibliography, and no small sum of money on research expenses and book-buying. In short, I need to sell a few copies of the bibliography (possibly chapter by chapter as I appreciate that users of this forum, for example, may be uninterested in paying for 8 chapters that aren't really about Luftwaffe air or flak operations). Much as I would like to make the whole thing available for free - and I have great admiration for those who do this sort of thing - I really need to recoup some of my costs, and so I can only include snippets here or on similar forums.

Anyway, here is the section about Luftwaffe night fighter ops relating to the summer 1944 campaign over western France. Any suggestions for additions / amendments will be much appreciated.

9. Luftwaffe night fighters during the Normandy campaign

9.1. General accounts:

Not very much has been published about Luftflotte 3’s night fighter operations, even though they took place on a reasonably large scale. Relevant sources are described below.

9.1.1. Primary sources and intelligence records:

According to online finding aids, there are fragmentary records relating to night fighter operations in the West during summer 1944 in the Bundesarchiv-Militärarchiv. Two of the documents are in 3. Jagddivision’s files. They include RL 8/178 (map dated 29 July, showing areas of responsibility over the Netherlands) and RL 8/236 (orders relating to night fighter tactics dated 8 August). There are also some 5. Jagddivision records, notably RL 8/226, which appears to contain reports on operations from 31 May to 29 June 1944.

‘G.A.F. Fighter Activity on the Western Front, dawn to dusk and dusk to dawn.’ This series of British intelligence reports is in the UK National Archives, HW 13/81. The documents contain detailed information about Luftwaffe night fighter operations from D-Day to the end of the campaign. See section 5.1.1. above for further details.

[ENTRY in section 5.1.1. = • ‘G.A.F. Fighter Activity on the Western Front.’ This series of British intelligence summaries (series PEARL/ZIP/BMP) is in the UK National Archives, HW 13/81 and HW 13/82. The documents describe Luftwaffe fighter activities from D-Day to 28 August 1944 (PEARL/ZIP/BMP 727-810). Like similarly-titled reports in HW 13/68 (see section 8.1.1. below), these summaries were based partly on deciphered signals sent using the ‘Enigma’ coding machine. They also utilised intercepted radio traffic between pilots and their ground controllers. Some pages are identical to material found in the HW 13/68 series. However, the latter contain detailed descriptions of day fighter operations that are omitted from HW 13/81 and HW 13/82. Perhaps more important, the summaries in HW 13/81 and HW 13/82 include a section (Part Two of each report) that deals with German night fighter activities. These are illustrated with maps to illustrate the routes taken by Allied bomber forces, information about the airfields and navigation aids used by the Germans, and narratives of night fighter operations.]

9.1.2. Secondary sources:

Aders, Gebhard (trans. Vanags-Baginskis, Alex): History of the German Night Fighter Force 1917-1945 (Jane’s Publishing Company, London 1979; 284pp., maps, illustrations). This is the English-language edition of the author’s Geschichte der deutschen Nachtjagd 1917-1945 (Motorbuch-Verlag, Stuttgart 1978). The book contains a lot of information about the history of the Luftwaffe night fighter forces and their equipment. There are numerous appendices containing aircraft production figures, details of victory claims etc. There are only a few pages (pp.168-70), however, that contain information about the role of German night fighters during the Normandy campaign.

Boiten, Theo and Mackenzie, Roderick: The Nachtjagd War Diaries: An Operational History of the German Night Fighter Force in the West, Volume Two – April 1944 to May 1945 (Red Kite, Walton-on-Thames 2008; 412pp., illustrations). According to the publisher’s website, the text of this book has been superseded by the more comprehensive and accurate account provided by the same author in his Nachtjagd Combat Archive series (see below and also section 4.2.2. above). For those who cannot access the latter, Chapter 7 of the original volume (pp.66-134) contains quite detailed information about Luftwaffe night fighter claims and losses during the Normandy campaign.

Boiten, Theo: Night Airwar: Personal recollections of the conflict over Europe, 1939-1945 (The Crowood Press, Marlborough 1999; 240pp., maps, illustrations). This is a compendium of descriptions of night-time air operations over Western Europe during World War II. It includes personal accounts both from German night fighter crew members, and from those they were trying to shoot down. Pages 151-5, 161-3 and 165-6 provide a small amount of information about German perspectives on this dimension of the Normandy campaign.

Boiten, Theo: Nachtjagd Combat Archive: 1944 Part 3, 12 May – 23 July 1944 (Red Kite, Walton-on-Thames 2020; 128pp., maps, illustrations). This book updates information originally covered in the author’s Nachtjagd War Diaries (see above). Pages 33-128 describe the achievements of German night fighters and flak against RAF Bomber Command from D-Day to late July 1944. Boiten uses a chronological structure, and numerous illustrations, to provide comprehensive coverage of German night fighter successes and losses over north-west Europe during the period covered by his book. He quotes extensively from intelligence records and from correspondence, diaries and other documents originating from German sources. Although the book lacks source notes or an index, it is by some distance the most important published source for Luftwaffe night fighter operations during the first seven weeks of the Normandy campaign.

Boiten, Theo: Nachtjagd Combat Archive: 1944 Part 4, 24 July – 15 October 1944 (Red Kite, Walton-on-Thames 2021; 128pp., maps, illustrations). This volume in a multi-book series continues the author’s detailed account of German night fighter operations during 1944. Pages 3-64 deal with the Luftwaffe’s achievements in the closing stages of the Normandy campaign. Particular attention is paid to ‘Sondereinsatz Heidelberg’ (Special Operation Heidelberg), during which several night fighter units carried out ground-attack missions against Allied forces in Normandy. Along with its companion volume (see above), this is an indispensable source for anybody interested in the contribution made by Luftwaffe night fighters to the defence of western Europe during summer 1944.

Clutton-Brock, Oliver: Massacre over the Marne: The RAF Bombing Raids on Revigny, July 1944 (Patrick Stephens Ltd., Sparkford 1994; 256pp., maps, illustrations). Pages 23-86 of this book describe three R.A.F. Bomber Command raids against a railway target in north-eastern France during July 1944 (two of which were abortive). During these raids, 41 Lancaster bombers were lost, mostly to German night fighters. The text is supported by clear mapping and many photographs. Extensive use of primary sources is made by the author, although unfortunately there are no footnotes.

Neuhaus, Stéphane and Cazenave, Stephan: “Pauke! Pauke! La chasse de nuit lourde allemande dans le ciel Normand (Part.2), 6.6. – 8.6.44”, in Bataille de Normandie 1944 Magazine, Number 5, 2021, pp.2-13. This French-language article describes operations by German night fighters over north-west France on the nights of 5-6, 6-7 and 7-8 June 1944. It is accompanied by many illustrations.

9.2. Units:

9.2.1. Nachtjagdgeschwader 1:

Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 was formed in 1940. It operated from airfields in the Netherlands, Belgium and western Germany. In early 1944 it had a Stab and four gruppen, all subordinated to 3. Jagddivision. It played only a minor part in the summer 1944 campaign. The geschwader withdrew to Germany in September 1944 and continued to fly sorties until the end of the war.

According to online finding aids, a reasonable quantity of Nachtjagdgeschwader 1’s records from summer 1944 survive and can be found in the Bundesarchiv-Militärarchiv. They include war diaries for I./ and II./NJG 1 (RL 10/539) and a chronicle of III./NJG 1’s activities that was produced after the war (RL 10/598). There are also lists of victory claims for the geschwader’s II. and III. gruppen (RL 10/572 and RL 10/620), plus a record of NJG 1’s own losses (RL 10/541). There is even a photo album (RL 10/706).

Apart from the war diaries described above, and some material mentioned in section 9.1. above, there do not seem to be any significant sources that shed much light on this unit’s operations during summer 1944. A minor exception is an intelligence report based on information provided by a member of III./NJG 1’s ground staff who was captured in autumn 1944 (see UK National Archives, AIR 40/2419, ADI(K)/564 of 20 October 1944).

9.2.2. Nachtjagdgeschwader 2:

Nachtjagdgeschwader 2 was created in autumn 1940 and expanded as the war continued. It carried out night intruder missions over the U.K. and then operated in Reich defence and in the Mediterranean theatre. On the eve of the Normandy invasion, NJG 2 consisted of a Stab and three gruppen. It played an important role in night-time operations during summer 1944, sending its Stab, plus I./ and II./NJG 2, from Holland and Germany to forward bases in France to enhance their effectiveness. These units were equipped with Ju 88 night fighters and operated as part of 5. Jagddivision. Towards the end of the campaign the two gruppen returned to Germany, where they continued to operate until the end of the war.

Rokker, Heinz: Chronik I. Gruppe Nachtjagdgeschwader 2 – I./NJG2, Juli 1940 bis Kriegsende 1945 (VDM Verlag, Zweibrücken 1997; 307pp., maps, illustrations). Unfortunately, I was unable to see a copy of this book before completing this bibliography. Possibly, it includes some information about events during summer 1944.

Williams, David: Nachtjäger: Luftwaffe Night Fighter Units 1939-1945 (Crécy Publishing Ltd., Manchester 2021; 192pp., illustrations). This book originally appeared as two separate volumes in 2005. Pages 135-9 provide information about an NJG 2 night fighter that landed in the U.K on the night of 12-13 July 1944 after becoming lost, along with several photographs of the aircraft. The incident represented a coup for the British, who discovered the latest version of the Luftwaffe’s airborne intercept radar, and various homing devices, on board the captured aircraft.

Six British intelligence reports, based on the interrogation of captured air crew and other sources, shed light on Nachtjagdgeschwader 2’s involvement in anti-invasion operations during summer 1944. See the following UK National Archives sources: AIR 40/2418 (ADI(K)/350, 407, 445, 461 and 462) and AIR 40/2419 (ADI(K)/511 and 564).

See also Appendix C to this chapter, monitoring reports SRA 5465, 5466, 5467, 5468, 5480, 5481 and 5482. All of these reports contain information provided by members of a Ju 88 night fighter crew from 7./NJG 2 who landed by accident in Suffolk on the night of 12-13 July 1944 after becoming hopelessly lost (see entry above under ‘Williams, David’). The capture of this fully intact aircraft was of great value in facilitating British counter-measures against Luftwaffe night fighter operations. See also SRA 5570, 5572, 5580, 5588, 5589, 5590, 5591, 5592, 5593, 5594, 5595 and 5596, which provide additional information about night fighter activities, mostly based on remarks made by a 6./NJG 2 wireless operator who was captured on 8 August 1944.

For additional information about the Ju 88 night fighter that landed in the U.K. on the night of 12-13 July, see ‘crashed enemy aircraft report No.242’ (16 July 1944) in the UK National Archives, AIR 40/45. In addition to a considerable amount of technical information, the report includes a diagram of the plane’s instrument panel and six photographs.

http://www.lexikon-der-wehrmacht.de/...der/NJG2-R.htm provides further information about this unit.

9.2.3. Nachtjagdgeschwader 3:

Nachtjagdgeschwader 3 was formed in 1940-41, initially with a Stab and three gruppen. A fourth gruppe was added in late 1942. In early 1944 the geschwader was based mostly in north-west Germany, subordinated to 2. Jagddivision. A few of its sub-units were temporarily re-located to France during the summer. They played a relatively minor role during the Normandy campaign.

Hinchliffe, Peter: The Lent Papers (Cerberus Publishing Ltd., Bristol 2003; xvi + 304pp., illustrations). This is a biography of a leading German night fighter ace who died in a flying accident in October 1944. Pages 244-9 describe his experiences during summer 1944, when he was based at a French airfield and achieved several successes against British bombers flying in support of the invasion forces.

A single British intelligence report, based on interrogation of a captured former member of this unit, sheds light on Nachtjagdgeschwader 3’s involvement in anti-invasion operations during summer 1944. See the following UK National Archives source: AIR 40/2419 (ADI(K)/578).

http://www.lexikon-der-wehrmacht.de/...der/NJG3-R.htm provides further information about this unit.

9.2.4. Nachtjagdgeschwader 4:

Nachtjagdgeschwader 4 was formed mostly in 1942. Its night fighters were based at airfields in Belgium, northern France and western Germany. On D-Day it had a Stab and three gruppen, equipped with a mix of Ju 88s, Do 217s and Me Bf 110s. By the end of the Normandy campaign, it had converted almost entirely to Ju 88s. Throughout the summer its units played an important role in night-time operations over France. Later the geschwader withdrew to Germany, where most of its units were disbanded at the end of March 1945.

Three British intelligence reports, based on the interrogation of captured aircrew and other sources, shed light on Nachtjagdgeschwader 4’s involvement in anti-invasion operations during summer 1944. See the following UK National Archives sources: AIR 40/2418 (ADI(K)/463) and AIR 40/2419 (ADI(K)/509 and 511).

See also Appendix C to this chapter, monitoring reports SRA 5575, 5576, 5577, 5578 and 5580.

http://www.lexikon-der-wehrmacht.de/...der/NJG4-R.htm provides further information about this unit.

9.2.5. Nachtjagdgeschwader 5:

Nachtjagdgeschwader 5 was formed in late 1942. By the start of the Normandy campaign it had a Stab and four gruppen. I./ and III./NJG 5 were based at airfields in north-eastern France. Initially they were equipped with Messerschmitt Bf 110s but during the summer they converted to Ju 88 twin-engine fighters. Several of the geschwader’s units participated in operations over France during summer 1944, after which they withdrew to Germany. NJG 5 continued to operate until the end of the war.

According to online finding aids, a chronicle of III./NJG 5’s activities from May 1943 to April 1945 can be found in the Bundesarchiv-Militärarchiv, RL 10/604. But this appears to be the only surviving source that relates to the Normandy campaign.

Zorner, Paul: Nächte im Bomberstrom: Erinnerungen 1920-1950 (NeunundzwanzigSechs Verlag, Moosburg 2007; 335pp., illustrations). This German-language memoir was written by the officer who commanded III./Nachtjagdgeschwader 5 during the Normandy campaign. Pages 258-76 describe his experiences flying a night fighter over France in summer 1944.

A single British intelligence report, based on captured documents, sheds light on Nachtjagdgeschwader 5’s involvement in anti-invasion operations during summer 1944. See UK National Archives, AIR 40/2418 (ADI(K)/472C).

For further information about this geschwader and its units, see http://www.lexikon-der-wehrmacht.de/...wader/NJG5.htm.

9.2.6. Kampfgeschwader 51:

For information about this unit see section 11.2.8. below.

Horn, Jan: Das Flurschaden-Geschwader: Die Chronik des Kampfgeschwaders 51 “Edelweiß” zwischen 1. Januar 1944 bis Kriegsende (self-published, 2010; 398pp., maps, illustrations). Intermittent night fighter operations by elements of this geschwader during the Normandy campaign are covered on pp.40-61 of this German-language book.

9.2.7. Jagdgeschwader 301:

Jagdgeschwader 301 was formed in autumn 1943 as a single-engine fighter unit equipped with Me Bf 109s. It operated both in the day fighter and night fighter roles. On D-Day it had a Stab and two gruppen. One of the latter, I./JG 301, was sent from Germany to France soon after the invasion began. It operated throughout the summer 1944 campaign, flying night-time missions against Allied bombers and other aircraft. At the end of August, it re-located to northern Germany, where it converted to Fw 190s. It continued to operate until the end of the war.

Frappé, Jean-Bernard: La Luftwaffe face au débarquement allié: L’intervention de la chasse allemande dans la bataille de Normandie et en Provence – Messerschmitt 109 G et Focke Wulf 190 A au combat, 6 juin – 31 août (Editions Heimdal, Bayeux 2018; 432pp., maps, illustrations). This French-language volume contains a chapter about operations by I./Jagdgeschwader 301’s single-engine night fighters during the Normandy campaign (pp.366-74).

Prien, Jochen; Stemmer, Gerhard; Bock, Winfried; & Balke, Ulf: Die Jagdfliegerverbände der Deutschen Luftwaffe 1934 bis 1945, Teil 13/VI – Einsatz in der Reichsverteidigung und im Westen, 1.1. bis 31.12.1944 (Buchverlag Rogge GmbH, Eutin 2020; 302pp., illustrations). This volume in a series about the role of the Luftwaffe’s fighter arm in the defence of the Reich and western Europe includes a section (pp.167-75) about I./JG 301’s activities during most of 1944. But because the authors are interested only in operations by day fighters, and I./JG 301 flew in the night fighter role during summer 1944, there is very little information about the Normandy campaign.

Reschke, Willi: Jagdgeschwader 301/302 “Wilde Sau”: In Defense of the Reich with the Bf 109, Fw 190 and Ta 152 (Schiffer Military History, Atglen 2005; 284pp., illustrations). This is the English-language edition of the author’s Jagdgeschwader 301/302 “Wilde Sau” (Motorbuch Verlag, Stuttgart 1999). Pages 82-144 contain several references to night fighter operations by I./JG 301 over France during the Normandy campaign. Appendices on pp.264-72 and p.275 provide details of victory claims and losses during the same period.

‘Wilde Sau’ (Night Defence of Germany by Single-Engined Fighters)’ (11pp.). This detailed British intelligence report is in the UK National Archives, AIR 40/2417 (ADI(K)/283 of 19 June 1944). The document sheds light on techniques used by single-engine night fighters of the type deployed by I./JG 301. ‘Wilde Sau’ (‘Wild Boar’) methods were used by this gruppe during their sorties throughout the Normandy campaign.

On 21 July 1944 two Messerschmitt Bf 109s belonging to JG 301 landed by mistake in the U.K. Information based on interrogation of their pilots (Feldwebel Manfred Gromill and Leutnant Horst Prenzel) can be found in three British intelligence reports. See UK National Archives, AIR 40/2418 (ADI(K)/371, 374 and 426) for details.

See also Appendix C to this chapter, monitoring reports SRA 5492, 5493, 5504, 5509, 5510, 5511, 5515, 5516, 5517, 5518, 5519, 5526, 5546, 5552 and 5559 (all covering information provided by Feldwebel Gromill).

For additional information about the two Me Bf 109s that landed in the U.K. on 21 July, see ‘crashed enemy aircraft report No.243’ (22 July 1944) in the UK National Archives, AIR 40/45.

Best,

Simon
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Old 4th April 2022, 19:11
leonventer leonventer is online now
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Re: Conversations between Luftwaffe prisoners - summer 1944 summary

Great stuff!! Now I'm REALLY looking forward to your book!

Thanks for the Nachtjagd sample,
Leon Venter
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