Luftwaffe and Allied Air Forces Discussion Forum  

Go Back   Luftwaffe and Allied Air Forces Discussion Forum > Discussion > Allied and Soviet Air Forces

Allied and Soviet Air Forces Please use this forum to discuss the Air Forces of the Western Allies and the Soviet Union.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 26th September 2017, 20:48
Leendert Leendert is offline
Alter Hase
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Belgium
Posts: 1,726
Leendert is on a distinguished road
Re: RAF Dakota loss Sept-Oct 1944

Laurent,

Locally no Dakota loss known near Knokke in Sept 44.
But is is indeed worth to note that at that time (Sept 44) the Germans still held a small corner of NW Belgium, with Knokke only liberated in the first days of Nov 44 (Operation Switchback).
Circumstances may therefore coincide with Rolland's suggestion of the Dakota straying into harm's way over Dunkirk.

At Adegem Canadian Cemetery, roughly between Brugge and Gent, rest many soldiers from a wide area around, especially from the Battle for the Scheldt.

KG512 a candidate still, only cause of loss to be established.

Regards,

Leendert
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 26th September 2017, 21:39
Leendert Leendert is offline
Alter Hase
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Belgium
Posts: 1,726
Leendert is on a distinguished road
Re: RAF Dakota loss Sept-Oct 1944

Laurent,

Correction of my last message....In a Sept 2005 post on Rafcommand fellow Belgian air history friend Luc Vervoort got advised by late Henk Welting that KG512 was shot down by Flak Unit 6./203. I gathered that this particular Marine Flak Abteilung was at Heist (Heyst), adjacent to Ramskapelle.

KG512 is said to have exploded over Ramskapelle, so the one near Knokke after all.

Laurent, thanks for questioning me, it made me dig deeper.
The Dakota must have flown over that one part of NW Belgium still in German hands, precisely the "Dunkirk" scenario Rolland brought forward.

I still wonder what "wrong" Diest the pilot had in mind. Ursel (B-67) between Brugge and Gent?

Regards,

Leendert
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 26th September 2017, 23:15
RSwank RSwank is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Bloomington, IN USA
Posts: 780
RSwank is on a distinguished road
Re: RAF Dakota loss Sept-Oct 1944

Maybe the confusion was between actually between "Diest" and "Heist", i.e. not a 2nd Diest, but a total misreading or misspelling of the name, perhaps even by Rohmer.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 27th September 2017, 22:23
Luc Vervoort Luc Vervoort is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Belgium
Posts: 277
Luc Vervoort is an unknown quantity at this point
Re: RAF Dakota loss Sept-Oct 1944

Hi all,

The second ' Diest ' was B.66 Blakenberg.

Have an eye on :
http://www.forgottenairfields.com/be...b-66-s219.html

quote :
Blakenberg airfield (also known as Assent airstrip or B.66 Blakenberg, or incorrectly 'Blankenberg') was an airfield 50 kilometers east of Brussels.
Construction began at 15:00 on 11 September 1944, east of the village of Assent and south of Diest on the border of the provinces Limburg and Brabant in a field known locally as 'Tienbunder' (ten acres). Even though it already froze during the nights, the airfields dirt track was completed on the evening of 13 September. The first three test landings (by a Typhoon) on the 14th were successful, but the decision was made to lay out SMT and build a perimeter track from the following morning. As a result, the airfield was not completed until the evening of Saturday 16 September, just in time for Operation Market Garden.

The airfield, codenamed B-66, was to be used by the Canadian 39th Reconnaissance Wing. It had a very short operational 'carreer', as rain made the field one large muddy pool. Applying PSP had little or no effect and as there were no hangars, mechanics had to perform maintenance in the open air in the middle of winter. A Dakota (C-47) that was to have brought tents and the luggage of the pilots never arrived and was listed as 'missing' on 21 Sep 1944. As a result, officers and crews of the wing were quartered with families in the Diest area. 6168 Servicing Echelon, a unit specialised in retrieving and repairing crash landed aircraft, began using the airfield as their base from 21 September.

On 4 October, the 3 squadrons (including 414Sqn) and 6168 Servicing Echelon left Assent/Blakenberg to operate from Eindhoven, which was both more comfortable and closer to the front. Blakenberg remained as an emergency airstrip, manned by a small contingent of Americans repairing the aircraft that were forced to land here, such as three 479FG P-51s that were short on fuel and landed on the airfield on 18 October 1944.
On 25 November 1944 a B-17G (42-40007 VP-M "Honey" of 381th Bomb Group, 533th Bomb Squadron) belly-landed here with heavy Flak damage, but as it was deemed beyond repair, it remained at the base. Over time it was slowly dismantled by the local population.
unquote

Best regards

Luc
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Question about two numbers on a data plate patelie Allied and Soviet Air Forces 5 28th October 2011 13:24
Update:107 Plane crash in WWII, 30 km around of Heidelberg Area Part 1 Klaus Deschner Allied and Soviet Air Forces 3 1st June 2010 01:07
Luftwaffe Aces KIA in Normandy in 1944 Christer Bergström Luftwaffe and Axis Air Forces 35 13th August 2005 21:10
Fighter pilots' guts Hawk-Eye Allied and Soviet Air Forces 44 8th April 2005 14:25
56th FG - friendly fire case on 4 May 1943 - info needed Lagarto Allied and Soviet Air Forces 28 12th March 2005 23:33


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 22:24.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004 - 2018, 12oclockhigh.net